Home > Uncategorized > Data show a recent decline in the developmentally disabled population in state-run residential care

Data show a recent decline in the developmentally disabled population in state-run residential care

Data provided by the Baker administration show that the number of residents in remaining state-run residential programs for the developmentally disabled has begun to decline, raising questions about the state’s policy for the future of state-run services.

The data, which were provided under a Public Records Law request, indicate that the previous fiscal year (2016) may have been the peak year for the residential population in state-operated group homes and the Wrentham and Hogan developmental centers.

The graph below, which is based on the DDS data, shows the number of residents living in state-operated group homes each year since Fiscal Year 2008:

State-ops census graph

As we have frequently pointed out, the administration appears to have placed a priority on funding privatized residential services offered by corporate providers to the Department of Developmental Services. A question remains, however, as to whether the administration’s policy also entails phasing out state-operated care.

While Governor Baker’s Fiscal 2018 budget proposes $59.9 million in additional funding for privatized group homes, his budget proposes a $1.8 million cut in the state-operated group home account. That would amount to a $6.9 million cut in that account when adjusted for inflation.

Similarly, the governor is proposing a  $2.4 million cut in the state-run developmental centers line item. That’s a $4.9 million cut when adjusted for inflation.

DDS operates or manages both state-run and privatized systems of residential care in Massachusetts. The state-run system, which is now much smaller than the privatized system, includes the two remaining developmental centers and the state-operated group homes.

The ultimate elimination of state-run residential services would take away a key element of choice for individuals and families in the DDS system. State-run residential centers and group homes provide residential care to some of the most profoundly disabled persons in the commonwealth, and they tend to employ staff with higher levels of training and lower rates of turnover than do corporate-run facilities.

COFAR has sent a follow-up Public Records request to DDS, seeking any policy documents that concern the future of state-operated care in Massachusetts.

The administration of then Governor Deval Patrick began closing the remaining developmental centers in Massachusetts in Fiscal 2008, reducing the number of those federally overseen facilities from six to two. Most of the residents in the now-closed developmental centers were transferred either to the Wrentham center or to state-operated group homes, leading to an initial surge in the residential populations in those facilities. But those residential population numbers now appear to be dropping.

According to the DDS data, the number of residents in state-operated group homes rose from just over 1,000 in 2008, when four of the six developmental centers were targeted for closure, to roughly 1,150 in Fiscal 2016. As of the current fiscal year, that number had dropped to about 1,130.

As the graph below shows, both a population surge and drop-off have also occurred at the Wrentham Developmental Center since Fiscal 2008:

ICF census graph

The DDS data appear to provide further confirmation of COFAR’s contention that state-run residential facilities are not being offered as residential choices to persons waiting for residential care in the DDS system. We believe that if those facilities were routinely offered as choices, the number of residents in them would either continue to rise or remain steady,  but would not be declining.

If DDS is failing to offer state-run group homes and developmental centers as options to people waiting for residential care, that situation would appear to be in violation of federal laws, which require that all available services be offered as options.

The Home and Community Based waiver of the Medicaid Law (42 U.S.C., Section 1396), requires that intellectually disabled individuals and their guardians be informed of the available “feasible alternatives”  for care. In addition, the federal Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C.,  Section 794) states that no disabled person may be excluded or denied benefits from any program receiving federal funding.

We think the DDS data closely track the closures of the Fernald, Monson, and Glavin developmental centers, starting in Fiscal 2008, and the transfer of the residents of those facilities primarily to the state-operated group homes and the Wrentham center.

But as we reported in 2014, while 49 new state-operated group homes were built between 2008 and 2014, 28 state-operated homes were closed during that period. The new state-operated homes appear to have been intended to accommodate only the residents of the homes that were being closed and the residents transferred from the developmental centers.

Nevertheless, an undisclosed number of disabled individuals are reportedly waiting for residential services in Massachusetts, although the state does not maintain an official waiting list that would publicly identify the number of people waiting.  The Massachusetts Developmental Disabilities Council has continued to cite a 2010 survey indicating that some 600 people were waiting for residential services in the state, and up to 3,000 people were waiting for family support services.

As noted, the administration appears to be attempting to meet the demand for residential care by boosting funding to corporate residential providers. While that hasn’t prevented the budgets of state-run developmental centers from increasing, those budgets may be leveling off.

The DDS data, which includes information about the Wrentham and Hogan developmental center budgets, shows increases in those budgets between Fiscal 2008 and 2015. Wrentham’s budget, in particular, appears to have leveled off, starting in Fiscal 2015.

ICF budget graph

It is unclear if or when the administration intends to phase out state-run DDS residential care, but the initial data are cause for concern. If you have a loved one in a state-run facility or are seeking care in a state-run setting, please let your local legislators know about this situation.

You can find your legislators at this link.

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