Home > Uncategorized > State Department denies passport for Mexico trip for developmentally disabled man

State Department denies passport for Mexico trip for developmentally disabled man

The State Department has denied a passport to a developmentally disabled and mentally ill man who had been planning to travel alone to Cancun later this month to meet a person or persons whom he had met online while playing a video game.

Kris Myerson, the mother of the 30-year-old man, whose name we are withholding, said her family was informed in late April by the Department of Mental Health in an email that her son’s passport application had been denied.

The passport denial effectively prevents the man’s trip, which in his family’s opinion would have been unsafe for him to make alone due to his developmental disability and serious mental illness.

The DMH email, dated April 24, stated that the State Department had denied the man’s passport application “on the basis that additional information was required.”

The email added that it was reported to DMH that the man was no longer interested in pursuing the passport “as the requested information was going to be difficult to obtain.” The email did not indicate what the additional information was that the State Department was seeking.

Myerson’s son has both autism and schizophrenia and is a client of both DMH and the Department of Developmental Services. He currently resides in a group home operated by ServiceNet, a provider funded by DMH.

COFAR has reported that Myerson was afraid her son could have been harmed in Mexico. He weighs about 123 pounds and is 5′ 11” and is emaciated, she said. At the very least, she feared he would get lost there.

In the past eight months, Myerson said, her son has been hospitalized for overdosing on Advil and for self-starvation and dehydration while in ServiceNet’s care. He is also on probation for having bitten an officer’s finger a number of years ago while being taken in for a mental health evaluation; but that probation is scheduled to end next week, prior to his formerly planned trip to Mexico.

Myerson said she is relieved that her son will not be traveling to Mexico although she noted that her son’s planned trip was not cancelled due to any initiative of either DMH or DDS. She added that her son remains under the residential care of ServiceNet, which assisted him in applying for the passport.

Lately, Myerson said, the family has been assured by the DMH commissioner’s office that the department “will be prioritizing her son’s safety through the transition from probation and into the future.”

Myerson further stated that DMH officials recently told her and her family that the department was working with DDS to improve their assessment of clients with “co-morbid autism and serious mental illness.”  She said DMH is aware that such individuals are often not properly assessed by evaluators and staff who have not been trained in autism spectrum disorders.

Myerson applied in 2014 to be her son’s guardian, but was unsuccessful because her son reportedly contested her application and because DMH sided with her son and against her bid for guardianship.

She and her family continue to have serious concerns with DMH and DDS and their role in monitoring and properly assessing her son’s abilities and safety. A DDS official, in fact, told Myerson late last month that her son had been found competent to make his own decisions about travel.

In an April 21 email to Myerson’s daughter, a DDS official stated that it was his understanding that Myerson’s son “has been evaluated several times in recent years and found to be a person who is competent to make his own decisions.  As such,” the email stated, “(Myerson’s son) has the right to decide such things as where he will live, where he will travel, etc. DDS is not an agency that can restrict a competent person’s choices in these areas.”

Myerson’s daughter maintained, however, that DDS had not evaluated her brother’s functioning level. She said that as a former client of Vermont Developmental Disability Services, her brother had had a court-ordered guardianship assessment by a professional evaluator “and was judged to be in need of a guardian at that time, based on his very low scores.” That was before he was relocated to Massachusetts.

Myerson said that persons with autism often use “scripted dialogue” that they acquire from movies or even from therapists themselves. That ability to memorize that dialogue without really understanding it can make those individuals appear highly intelligent and insightful and can even fool mental health professionals who do not have deep knowledge of Asperger’s and other autism-related conditions.

The use of such scripted dialogue is one means by which some persons with autism attempt to hide their condition from others — a process sometimes referred to as “camouflaging.”

Myerson noted that her son “has many ‘savant’ skills” such as high-level vocabulary and “echoic memory with ability to absorb and spew back large tracts of dialogue gleaned from movies, youtube videos, etc.” Yet, those skills, she said, do not represent her son’s functioning level or overall cognitive abilities.

Myerson said her son has a “borderline” IQ and cannot perform basic math skills such as division and multiplication, cannot write a paragraph, and has no danger awareness – a common characteristic of people with autism. She said he has gone to sleep with lit candles on his bed and has ridden his bike in front of cars when trying to cross streets.

A DMH official did not return a call last week from COFAR, seeking more information on the efforts reportedly being made by the department and DDS to improve its assessment of clients with co-morbid autism and mental illness.

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  1. Ed
    May 9, 2017 at 12:42 am

    For whatever reason that the State Department denied the passport in this instance, I would have hoped that DMH and/or DDS would have stopped this process before it got to this point on their own, with the mother’s request in the interest of her son’s safety. When it comes to safety, common sense should carry at least as much weight as blind adherence to guardianship/competency status. Isn’t the well-being of the individual the heart of any given situation?

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